Kids Articles

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The following pages are taken from sections of our quarterly journal Oak Leaves which are called "Kids Pages".Oak Leaves 3 Kids Pages: LughnasadhOak Leaves 4 Kids Pages: SamhainOak Leaves 5 Kids Pages: ImbolcCraft Ideas for YuleWinter Time CraftsThese pages contain puzzles, word games, etc. which kids might enjoy, and which adults might enjoy doing with them :)
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Resource Books Here are a few of the resource books, I have found which focus on earth-related activities for children (in no particular order). I will be adding to this list as the kids' pages expand. Send us information on books you have found helpful and interesting. Older Kids Animal Rights Handbook, by John Kullberg, Pres., ASPCA. Pub: Living Planet Press Dear World: How our Children Around the World Feel About Our Environment by Lannis Temple,ed. Pub: Random House 50 Simple Things Kids Can Do To Save the Earth by The Earth Works Group. Pub: Andrews and McMeel, A Universal Press Syndicate Company. Rescue Mission: Planet Earth, A Children's Edition of Agenda 21. In Association with the United Nations. Pub: Kingfisher Books Save the Earth: An Ancient Handbook for Kids by Betty Miles. Pub: Alfred A. Knopf This Planet is Mine (teaching Environmental Awareness and Appreciation to Children) by Mary Metzger and Cinthya Whittaker. Pub: Simon and Schuster Younger Children (2-10 yrs.) Earthways: Simple Environmental Activities for Young Children by Carol Petrash. Pub: Gryphon House Good Earth Art by MaryAnn Kohl and Cindy Gainer. Pub: Bright Ring Publishing Kids Wildlife Book: Exploring Animal Worlds Through Indoor/Outdoor Experiences by Warner Shedd. Pub: Williamson Publishing Nature For the Very Young by Marcia Bowden. Pub: John Wiley and Sons,Inc. Lughnasadh Word Search L A M M A S S Y T G A U S H C S H F H A R I G M O A A E G M E T L H R M R S I E N L T W N F V T F S U I S R D A E I A W F A A A O O S V I N Z T E E L L T A L B A R F P L H A L D W B Q P S Y F R B S H Find: Balor Harvest Bread Lammas Corndolly Loafmas Fail Lughnasadh Feast Spear Festival Tailtiu Fight Funeral Games Maze Help the Viking find his horn before the Althing! A Summer Pond: There are lots of plants and insects in this picture. Can you unscramble their names, and figure out which name goes to which plant or animal? After you have done that, color the picture! tuyfbertl _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ (there are 3 of these) gydulba _ _ _ _ _ _ _ hmto _ _ _ _ itwyellar _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ (there are 3 of these) fgordyaln _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ (there are 3 of these) ekttscisicn _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ melfaysld _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ lfayym _ _ _ _ _ _ sulbrulh _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ (there are 3 of these) utoqmiso _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ yeeehbon _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Can you identify each animal and find its missing part? Summer Pond Word Scramble Answer Key butterfly, moth, dragonfly, damsel fly, bulrush, ladybug, water lily, stick insect, mayfly, mosquito, honeybee.
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Straw and Twine Mask You will need straw, twine or jute, pieces of cloth, glue, needle and thread, scissors, plastic milk jug, feathers, glitter and beads. The cloth needs to be large enough to cover your face. First, roll the twine into two coils that are large enough to surround your eyes. Don't worry about getting them perfectly round (oval or some other irregular shapes look good too) and add expressions. Leave an opening in the center that is large enough for you to see out. The coils can be sewn or glued to stick them together. Be careful about the type of glue you use since it will be close to your eyes. Cover the cloth with glue and attach the coils where your eyes will be. Make other coils for a mouth and cheeks if you want. Attach these coils to the cloth and leave an opening for the mouth. Cut holes in the cloth for the eyes and mouth. If you are making the mask to hang on a wall or stick you can cut eyes and fangs/teeth from the milk jug. Glue them in place. Sew or glue straw to the uncovered cloth areas of the mask. Add beads, feathers and glitter/paint to decorate your mask. Tie a string or piece of elastic around the back to hold the mask onto your face or to hang. If you are making the mask to hang on a wall or stick you can cut eyes and fangs/teeth from the milk jug. Glue them in place. Aluminum Foil Mask Fold a sheet of foil that's about 12 inches by 30 inches in half lengthwise. It should now be 12 inches by 15 inches. Mold the foil over your face. Press the foil gently into your facial features, keeping your eyes closed. Using your fingernails, tear eye holes, nostril holes and a mouth opening. Remove the mask from your face. Trim or fold in the extra foil at the edges. Poke holes and attach string or elastic to the sides. Glue on more pieces of foil or other decoration as you want. Not a Jack - O - Lantern You have probably made many Jack-o-lanterns from pumpkins already. Try something different this year by using other kinds of squash. Some squash are hard and difficult to carve. If you microwave them for a short period of time they will soften. Prick the shell with a fork to vent. Draw a design or face on the shell of the squash. Use a knife with the help of an adult to carve along the lines. Cut off the top and scoop out the inside so that only the shell remains. Use a flashlight or a candle to light up your design. You could also paint or glue paper designs and faces on the squash. Weaving with a Branch You will need a branch with at least three smaller branches, colored yarn about two yards long, and items from nature such as corn husks, feathers, herbs, long grasses, cattail parts, leaves and flowers. Starting at the bottom of the branch, loop yarn around and around, continuing to loop out towards the end/top of the branch. Weave yarn and natural objects through the loops. The placement of the objects may be random or in a specific design. As a variation you may tie shells, seed pods, macaroni, beads or holed stones on the yarn before you weave. To display your work, you could hang it or place it in a can of sand to hold it upright. Cornhusk Dolls If you use fresh corn husks from a farm or garden, air dry them completely and store them loosely in a box until you're ready to use them. You could also purchase the husks from a craft supply store. Corn husks can be softened by soaking them in a pan of water with three teaspoons of glycerin. Soak them for a few minutes, and lay on a towel to soak up the excess water. To make a doll, lay about six husks on top of each other. Gather them together about an inch from one end and fasten a rubber band tightly around them. Forming the head, you pull the ends back over the banded area and fasten with another rubber band. Roll two husks together lengthwise in a single tight roll. Fasten two rubber bands near the ends. This arm section is tucked inside the body, below the neck. Wrap some yarn, string or a rubber band in a crisscross across the body to fasten the arms. Trim the bottom of the husks to create a dress or cut into two even sections to create legs. Wrap each leg section tightly at the ankle. You can glue corn silk, twine, yarn, moss or other material to the head for hair. Add other features to create unique dolls. Samhain Word Search Find all the words, and the leftover letters will spell a tasty fall treat! A C H S S M N O D R N J P O T P R O E N N O A H P T A I O R E G I C N U L H E R T R W H K O T N E T D I S I O O P R L T S R N T E G L S M N E S A I E S C A L T U A R H M B W E N N A C P A S O H E Y T A T H G I R F K A R E P P U S B M U D B I R A L L E H S K U L L N O R D L U A C S C R Y Find: Ancestors Hunts Antlers Jack o lantern Apples Mask Cauldron Morrigan Corn New Year Death Pumpkin Donn Rebirth Dumbsupper Samhain Fright Sap Ghost Scry Halloween Skull Hella Spirits Mix and Match Can you match the pairs of objects? The first one is done for you. Choose 4 or 5 of these objects and make up a story about them. Write it down (or ask a grown-up to write it down for you) and send it to Oak Leaves. We'll print the best one so everyone can read it!
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Feed the Birds! It's fun to make useful things and watch them being used by living creatures. Many birds stay north during the winter. The snow and cold make it difficult for them to find food, Making a bird feeder and hanging it in. a place where you can watch the birds will be a lot of fun! Make a list of all the different types of birds you see. Compare your list with friends in different parts of the country. Make sure to hang your bird feeder away from fences and other bushes where cats could get to them. Pipe Cleaner Bird Feeders: Take a pipe cleaner and turn one tip into a tiny L-shape. Then string the pipe cleaner with Cheerios, leaving a short length to be bent over to hold the cereal. After shaping the pipe cleaner in to a cane shape, hang it outside for the birds. When the birds have eaten all of the cereal it can be refilled. Milk Carton Feeder: Use scissors to cut a large rectangle out of two opposite sides of a milk carton leaving a three to four inch lip on the bottom. Make two holes in the bottom lip and slide a thin dowel rod through letting it make a perch on two sides for the birds to sit on as they eat. Cut a hole to insert a string for hanging. Jug Bird Feeder: Cut away the sides and top of the jug, leaving a base of about 1 1/2 inches. Poke 2 holes in the plastic with a nail using scissors or a knife to enlarge the holes it needed. Push a stick or dowel through the holes, so it pokes out both sides to give the birds a perch. Poke two holes through the top and insert a wire or string for hanging. Pine Cone feeder: Use a plastic or butter knife to spread peanut butter all over a pine cone. Be sure you cover the whole pinecone. Place a layer of birdseed in a pan and roll the cone in the seed until it is covered. Tie a string around one end of the pinecone and hang it from a tree branch. If you don't have a pinecone, use an empty toilet tissue tube. A Celtic Head To the Pagan Celts the human head was a symbol of the soul of the power of spirit of speech and of vision. They carved many heads of stone and wood and seem to have used them in their places of worship and their ceremonies. They even practiced the taking of heads in war, sometimes keeping the heads or skulls as magical objects. This carved stone head was found at the eastern end of the Celtic lands, in what is now the Czech Republic. It shows a Celtic man in the traditional style of his people. His hair is combed straight back, his big curling mustache covers his lip, and his strong jaw gives him a courageous look. Around his neck is a torc, the symbol of Celtic tribal identity or nobility. We don't know who the statue might be. It: could be a specific Chief or King, it could be one of the Holy Ancestors, or it could be a God. Maybe it's the Dagda! The Magical Alphabet of the Vikings The Pagan Norse invented this alphabet, called the Runes. The word Rune means 'secret', or 'magical'. The Runes are a powerful set of magical symbols, that Pagan study for many years. But the Norse people also used Runes for writing, and to send messages. You can learn the Runes and use them to send messages to your Pagan friends, or even to the Gods and Goddesses! Notice that the order of the alphabet is different from our English one, and that some Runes have to be used for more than one letter. That's because the Runes were created by people who spoke Scandinavian languages, which are a little different from English. Translate the message on this page to get started learning the Runes.   Word Search T R I P L E F L A M E M N F S E F I W D I M R A E P A I M B O L C K I E P O M R U A D A N A F G R E E K C O N N A B O M E T L W S H T R A E H O S R D T E C T K D O L T E Y N R T G N I L A E H R D A G D A R N M I D E B O C L L B C B Y S M R Find all the words, and the leftover letters will spell this fun Imbolc activity. Bannock Imbolc Bres Lamb Brideog Midwife Candlemas Milk Cattle Mother Dagda Poetry Ewe Ruadan Fire Serpent Healing Smithcraft Hearths Triple flame Maze Help the lamb find its mother.
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Bird FeedersThis time of year is tough for our feathered friends up north, and I'm sure that the ones in the South wouldn't mind a free meal either. An easy and fun craft project is to make bird feeders from pine cones. Here's what you will need:pine cones or stale donuts peanut butter bird seed ribbon, yarn or stringFirst, take a piece of string (or whatever you have) and tie it around the pine cone. Make sure it is long enough, as you will use the loop to hang the bird feeder from a branch. Next, put some birdseed into a bowl (about 1 cup or so). Then mix enough peanut butter in so that the birdseed clumps together like clay. Press this mixture into the spaces in the pine cone or onto the donut. Hang on a tree, and watch to see what kind of birds come to eat there. Have fun!Decorative CandlesThese are really easy to make, and can be made for most holidays. You will need the following:candles (tapers or votives, we usually use votives) thin sheets of soft wax (can be found in crafts stores, often with pre-cut designs) Optional: small buttons, cookies cutters, or drinking straws (to make shapes for cutting the sheet wax...ask an adult for help here), poster paints.Use the cookie cutters or scissors to make shapes to use as decorations. If you have buttons, you can use these to press designs in the wax too. Stick your soft wax designs onto the taper or votive candles. You can also use paints to make designs or pictures on the candles. See if you can make a candle for each High Day.Sand DesignsThese can be very pretty and make good gifts for family and friends. Here's what you will need:Glass or plastic containers (clear ones, with wide mouths) 2-3 boxes of salt food coloring in different colors bowls to mix the salt in (one for each color you want to use a pencil or popsicle stick Optional: melted parafin wax (ask an adult for help) or plastic wrap to cover the top of the containerPut 1-2 cups of salt in a bowl. Mix in enough food coloring to make the color you want. Be sure to add it a little bit at a time (about one teaspoonful). If you have a four pack of food coloring, here's some combinations to get other colors: For purple, use blue and red. For orange, use red and yellow. For brown use red and green, and if you add some blue to this, you can get a sort of black color.Once you have your colors, you can start by putting one color in the bottom of the container you chose. Use the stick to make hills and valleys along the edges. Pour another color on top of this, making sure it filled the areas you pushed down. Continue layering the colors until it is full. Cover it if desired. If you do not cover it, then you have to make sure it is someplace safe so it doesn't spill and spoil your creation.Sculpy Clay ActivitiesSince Sculpy clay bakes and becomes a plastic type subsctance, it's good for making your own set or runes or ogham sticks. Find a picture of the runes or of the ogham. For runes make a circular design, for ogham try a stick like design. Use one color as a base and another as the design or use paint to add the design afterwards.Follow the directions for baking on the package. Some other ideas for Sculpy craft are making beads, pagan or other type pendants, small statues of your favorite gods or goddesses, wall or window hangings, or even something to offer at ritual. Be sure to follow the directions for baking, and if you need permission, make sure you check with an adult before using the oven. But above all have fun :)
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Liafal's picture
Pine Cone WreathPine cones are excellent material for making art and crafts. They come in lots of shapes and sizes. When collecting, it's important to leave behind the cones that haven't opened. The seeds from these cones should be left so that the animals such as squirrels and chipmunks have something to eat. Find the cones that have the tips spread open. After you bring home the cones and allow them to dry, you need a wreath base to attach the cones to. A pizza box or other sturdy cardboard could be used to make a doughnut shape or any other shape you might like. You can attach the cones with a hot glue gun or tub and tile caulk that comes in tubes. You can add other natural materials such as dried flowers, leaves, moss, or stones if you like. Attach a wire loop to the back of the wreath and hang.Bread People and other Bread ShapesYou need:1 cup water 1 cup salt 3 cups flour mixing bowlWhat to do: Mix all the ingredients together in a mixing bowl. Knead the dough until it's smooth. The dough should feel smooth and rubbery when it's ready to form. To make a bread person make a small ball for the head and a larger ball for the body. Connect the two using a drop of water. Roll the dough to make arms and legs. You can press a small amount of the dough through a garlic press to make the hair, or just form it around the head. Attach the arms, legs, and hair to the body using a little water. Add cloths using more dough and draw a face with a toothpick. You could also make ornaments for your Yule tree - try using cookie cutters! Ask a grown-up to bake your bread in an oven for 2-3 hours at 275 degrees. Let cool and decorate with tempra paints if you wish.Pomander BallsYou need:oranges, lemons or apples push pins or small nails whole cloves spice mixture:ground, allspice, cardamom, cloves — mix you own combination shallow pan to hold the spice mixture yarn or ribbon for hangingWhat to do: If necessary (when using a thick-skinned fruit), use the nail or push pin to puncture holes in the skin of the fruit about 1/4 inch apart. Press the whole cloves directly into the fruit, working to cover most of the skin of the fruit. This can be done over several days. When the fruit is studded with cloves, roll the fruit in the spice mixture. Knot two pieces of yarn or ribbon together at the middle and place the pomander over the knot. Take up the four ends, tie them together in a firm knot and then tie a bow.
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