Training

Training

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Books: Gaulish Celtic Studies:Ancient Fire: An Introduction to Gaulish Celtic Polytheism by Segomâros Widugeni: This is a go-to for anyone who is looking for a good introduction book to Gaulish polytheism.The Celtic Gauls: Gods, Rites, and Sanctuaries by Jean-Louis Brunaux: This book is a short, but a condensed overview of the Gaulish Celts and their culture.The World of the Druids by Prof. Miranda Aldhouse-Green PhD: She references some of the Celtic material from Britain and Ireland, but most of this text is about the Gaulish CeltsLady with a Mead Cup: Ritual, Prophecy and Lordship in the European Warband from La-Tene to the Viking Age by Michael J. EnrightA Crane Breviary and Guide Book: Rituals for the Cranes of ADF, when they must kindle their own Good Fire by Rev. Michael J DanglerBooks: Gaulish Language Studies:Dictionnaire de la langue gauloise : Une approche linguistique du vieux-celtique continental (French Edition) by Xavier DelamarreLes noms des gaulois (French Edition) by Xavier DelamarreBooks: General Celtic Studies with Gaulish References:The Gods of the Celts by Prof. Miranda Aldhouse-Green PhDThe Ancient Celts by Barry CunliffeThe Magic Arts in Celtic Britain by Lewis Spence Books: Other Resources and Studies with Gaulish References:Our Own Druidry: Publication by Ár nDraíocht Féin: a Druid FellowshipMyths and Symbols in Pagan Europe by H.R. Davidson Videos: Gaulish and Other Resources:Cernunnos: Looking Every Which Way: by Ceisiwr Serith, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Ap3LEcfVig&t=961sThe Gaulish God Taranis: by Ceisiwr Serith, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=233DWe89JRs&t=252sA Tour of the Nautes Pillar: by Rev. Michael J Dangler, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6lzpQzxTk6c&feature=emb_logo Websites: Gaulish and Other Resources:Esus: by Rev. Michael J Dangler, http://www.chronarchy.com/esus/Cernunnos: Looking a Different Way: by Ceisiwr Serith, https://www.ceisiwrserith.com/therest/Cernunnos/cernunnospaper.htmNemeton Segomâros; Gaulish Polytheism in the Woods of Florida: by Segomâros Widugeni, http://polytheist.com/segomaros/page/7/Epona.net; A Scholarly Resource: by Natonos and Ceffyl (non-ADF), http://epona.net/index.htmlDeo Mercurio: by Viducus, son of Briganticus (non-ADF), http://www.deomercurio.be/en/index.htmlGaulish Personal Name Elements: by Rev. Michael J Dangler, http://www.chronarchy.com/essays/gaulpersnames.htmlFacebook Gaulish Polytheism Community (non-ADF): https://www.facebook.com/groups/162531797160858/
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Below is a list of books which compliments our standard suggested reading list. These resources are not required to work the Dedicant Path nor can they be used for the book reviews you will need to submit to document your work on the Dedicant Path (unless they are also listed above). These books, especially those in the first section that deal specifically with ADF's own flavor of Druidy, are listed in order to help our students grow and learn what the Druid Path is all about, while giving them both the grounding in history and the ritual knowledge needed to deepen the work on this path..This list is grouped into the following categories: Our Own Druidry; Overviews of European Paganism: Overviews of Specific Cultural Systems, Ritual and Devotional Support, Meditation and Altered States of Awareness, Ogham and Runes, Theology and Other Forms of Modern Druidry.Note: ADF will receive a referral bonus if you order from Amazon through a link on this page - thanks!Our Own DruidryA Book of Pagan Prayer - Ceisiwr SerithBonewits Essential Guide to Druidism - Isaac BonewitsThe Solitary Druid - Robert 'Skip' EllisonSacred Fire, Holy Well - Ian CorriganThe Druid's Alphabet - Skip EllisonOverviews of European PaganismFrom Olympus to Camelot: The World of European Mythology - David LeemingOverviews of Specific Cultural SystemsDeep Ancestors: Practicing the Religion of the Proto-Indo-Europeans - Ceisiwr SerithMagic of the Celtic Gods and Goddesses - Carl McColmanThe Complete Idiot's Guide to Celtic Wisdom - Carl McColmanExploring the Northern Tradition - Galina KrasskovaMysteries of Demeter - Jennifer ReifIndo-European Poetry and Myth - M.L. West (for Proto-Indo-European studies)Ritual and Devotional SupportThe Book of Pagan Prayer - Ceisiwr SerithA Circle of Stones - Erynn LaurieCreating Circles and Ceremonies - Oberon and Morning Glory Ravenheart-ZellMeditation and Altered States of AwarenessMonsters and Magical Sticks: There's No Such Thing as Hypnosis - Steven HellerPrometheus Rising - Robert Anton WilsonOgham and RunesThe Druid's Alphabet - Skip EllisonOgham: Weaving Word Wisdom - Erynn Rowan LaurieTaking Up The Runes - Diana PaxsonTheologyThe Myth of the Eternal Return, or, Cosmos and History - Mircea EliadeThe Sacred and the Profane - Mircea EliadeA World Full of Gods - John Michael GreerThe Deities Are Many: A Polytheistic Theology - Jordan PaperPagan Theology: Paganism as a World Religion - Michael YorkSacred Gifts - Rev. Kirk ThomasBooks About Other Forms of Modern DruidryThe Druid Renaissance - Phillip Carr-Gomm, ed.The Druidry Handbook - John Michael GreerThe Mysteries of Druidry - Brendan 'Cathbad' Myers
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This page lists books published by ADF members. These books are not officially endorsed by ADF, but are nonetheless reflective of how some of our members approach and integrate Our Druidry into their lives. Listed by author.Note: ADF will receive a referral bonus if you order from Amazon through a link on this page - thanks!Books by Isaac Bonewits, ADF Founder and Archdruid Emeritus (website)Real MagicBonewits's Essential Guide to DruidismNeopagan Rites: A Guide to Creating Public Rituals that WorkWitchcraft: A Concise GuideBooks by Isaac Bonewits, ADF Founder and Archdruid Emeritus (website) and Phaedra BonewitsReal EnergyBooks by Ian Corrigan, Bard Laureate and Archdruid Emeritus (website)Sacred Fire, Holy WellBook of Nine MoonsDraiocht - A Book of Celtic SorceryBooks by Skip Ellison, Archdruid Emeritus (website)The Divine Liver: The Art and Science of HaruspicyThe Fairy Races of the British IslesOgham: The Secret Language of the DruidsThe Solitary Druid: Walking The Path Of Wisdom And SpiritThe Wheel of the Year At Muin Mound Grove, ADF (Kindle Edition)Books by Ceisiwr Serith (website)Deep Ancestors: Practicing the Religion of the Proto-Indo-EuropeansA Book of Pagan PrayerA Pagan Ritual Prayer BookThe Pagan Family (great, but out-of-print)Books by John Michael GreerPlease note that John Michael Greer is a prodigious author with many more titles to his name than are listed here.A World Full of Gods: An Inquiry into PolytheismBooks by John Opsopaus (Apollonius Sophistes)The Pythagorean TarotBooks by HearthstoneDevotion: Prayers to the Gods of the GreeksBooks by Michael J Dangler (website)The Call of the Crane: A Working Guide for Members of the ADF Order of the Crane (With James "Seamus" Dillard)The Very Basics of RunesFrom Private Practice To Public Ritual: Ritual Foundations I (Pagan Fire Seminars) (Volume 1)The Very Basics of PendulumsThe ADF Dedicant Path Through the Wheel of the YearAnd the WotY journal companionBooks by the members of Three Cranes Grove, ADFThe Fire on Our Hearth: A Devotional of Three Cranes Grove, ADFBooks by Stone Creed Grove, ADFThe Stone Creed Grove BreviaryBooks by Alaric AlbertssonTravels Through Middle Earth: The Path of a Saxon PaganWyrdworking: The Path of a Saxon SorcererBooks by Su "Ratatask" EavesFrom Saga's Hall: Norse Myths from a Different Point of ViewBooks by Jean "Drum" PaganoArise from VapoursWillow FlowA Tree for the Earth Mother (with Philip Carr-Gomm, Damh the Bard, Kristoffer Hughes, and others)Saulé and the SunriseSaulé and the SunsetBooks by G.R. GroveThe Druid's SonStorytellerFlight of the HawkThe Ash SpearStoryteller SongsKing Arthur's Raid on Hell and Other PoemsPryderi's Pigs and other poemsBooks by Wayne KeysorThe Well of MysteryBooks by Melissa BurchfieldThe Order of Bardic Alchemy Training Program Manual: An Order of Ár nDraíocht Féin : A Druid Fellowship (The Orders of ADF) (Volume 2)Books by Jennifer GaddThe Second BattleBooks by Kirk ThomasSacred Gifts: Reciprocity and the Gods
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Below are some resources we have found useful in progressing through ADF's training programs or just learning more about Our Druidry.A Recommended Reading List for DedicantsRecommended Out-of-Print BooksOther Recommended ReadingA List of Primary Source MaterialReadable Mythology BooksBooks by ADF MembersAncestors of the CeltsA Druid Irish DictionaryLearning Ancient I-E LanguagesADF members can find more resources in the members training section.
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I came to ADF after about five years of searching for a place where I could learn about spirituality and how my ancestors lived and worshipped. I basically wanted a place where I could learn—I was so tired of reading books where authors would differ on the same subject, and when I would ask others that had been following the path longer than I about the differences, I was always told, "It's however you feel it should be." I found in ADF a road map, if you will, of how to go about learning what I needed and wanted to learn.I was very concerned that what I wrote would not be what someone thought it should be, but this was not the case. I joined ADF in 1999 and one year later had finished my Dedicant's Program and ever since that time I have been very much into learning and spirituality—I just can't seem to get enough. I felt greatest pride when I wrote my Dedicant's Ritual; even though all of it was not mine, this paved the way for me to delve into writing other rituals.After finishing the Dedicant's Program, I felt the urge to promote it to others. I cannot emphasize enough how much finishing the program has aided me in my knowledge and spirituality. I really don't think people realize how much it will change them, and there is no easy way to convince them. When I would hear some say, "Why should I have to write it down?" or, "Well, I could just say I read the book, who would know?", this would frustrate me to no end. I now realize that there is no way for me to make people start or finish the Dedicant Program. I'm just happy that I have taken that first step, and boy has it opened a lot of doors into knowledge and spirituality for me.I still cannot emphasize enough the Dedicant's Program is great! I'm very happy to be a part of this wonderful group of people and look forward to more learning and growing.
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When I came to ADF, I came at the behest of a group of eclectic pagan friends who would roll their eyes at my constant theological and cosmological questions, and who ultimately suggested that I would be happier with "those Druids" because Druids think about such things.I came to ADF dragging behind me 30 years of Christian ministry. I immediately resonated with the people and loved the liturgy, but polytheism was so very foreign to me, and I didn't enjoy the mythology very much. Add to that my natural resistance to going from being on the cutting edge of the then current wave of Christian theology known as "cosmic spirituality," and suddenly finding myself a neophyte.I brought this baggage to the Dedicant Program. I didn't resist it, but I wasn't really sure how valuable it would be. I kind of thought of it as a stepping stone to be "gotten through" so I could get on with what I was really interested in—the clergy study program.By the time I completed all the documentation nine months later, I was astounded at the change the Dedicant Program had wrought in me. I no longer felt like a Yawhist who was studying Druidry, I began to feel like a Druid. I remember asking our Senior Druid in the beginning if I would really be a Druid if I believed in One God/Many Aspects rather than being a true polytheist. By the time I finished the DP, it was no longer an issue because I now had patrons, and the concept of polytheism was as natural as monotheism had seemed before.The dedicant's journey was truly an adventure, not only anp unforgettable one, but one that opened up whole new worlds and paradigms for me. From my first foray into Berresford Ellis's The Druids to the last pen stroke of my patron rite, I was immersed in a whole new world, one that has become my life and my breath.
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The Dedicant Path (DP) is ADF's beginning training program that serves as a year-long introduction to the beliefs and practices of Our Druidry. It is also the prerequisite for other ADF training systems such as guild study programs.Frequently Asked QuestionsA Preview of the Dedicant PathA Further Preview: Right ActionA Further Preview: Pagan PietyOnline Dedicant JournalsUncertainty and the Dedicant JourneyThe DP: A Milestone on a Wondrous JourneyInside the Dedicant Path (1)Inside the Dedicant Path (2)
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When Isaac Bonewits founded ADF, he wrote in his Vision statement that: In ADF we believe that excellence in clergy training and practice is vital for any healthy, growing religion. To that end we are attempting to create a professional clergy training program equal in difficulty and superior in results to anything done by the world's other religions. Unlike many alternate religions, we will never have "instant initiations" into our clergy. The path toward clergy within ADF is not easy: you cannot purchase credentials from us (indeed, the cost of the training is, at this time, simply the cost of membership in ADF: there are no hidden fees), nor can you bring "transfer credit" from another tradition with you (though we encourage those who are interested to study in more than just our tradition). In order to become clergy in ADF, you must engage in our training programs and complete them. The program of study is built to require a disciplined approach to Our Druidry over time, as well as providing the practical and theoretical knowledge that a Priest will need. The steps are fairly simple: Join ADF. Complete the documentation for the ADF Dedicant Path (which takes approximately 1 year of solid study). Complete the baseline clergy training (this can be done, depending on how focused you are, in about six to twelve weeks). Complete the First Circle of the ADF Clergy Training Program (roughly one year of dedicated study). Once you have completed the First Circle of the CTP, you are eligible to be ordained as an ADF Priest. To become an ADF Consecrated Priest, there is an additional year-long training course to be taken. An ADF Senior Priest can expect to train for one additional year. Keep in mind that the above timelines are based on a student who spends his or her time deeply involved in the study surrounding their clergy training. Most students will take longer than the minimum amount of time indicated above. The path of an ADF Priest is open to all members of ADF at this time, whether male or female, old or young (so long as you're past your 18th birthday), solitary or Grove-affiliated. Completion of the Clergy Training Program does not guarantee that you will become clergy, as background checks and ritual skill factor in as much (or more) than academic work. While we don't have a system of endless interviews, we do hope to meet our candidates prior to their ordinations: please do consider attending local festivals where you can meet some of our members and leadership. So, here are the big three questions most people ask: Question: How much does it cost to become an ADF Priest? Answer: By keeping your ADF membership current, you have paid all you need to pay to ADF for the training. When you apply for ordination, there may be an administrative cost (to cover background checks or ritual items), or travel costs to get to a festival, but those costs are nominal in general. This is "cheap" compared to other courses of study, we know. But we believe our students will pay back to the Pagan community far more than the cash value of their training, and that's more than enough for us. Question: How long does it take before I can become ordained? Answer: It depends on the student, but you should expect a minimum of 2 years. Some students have taken as long as 6-7 years before feeling prepared to apply for ordination. Question: Can I transfer previous experience/coursework/training into the CTP? Answer: No, the ADF Clergy Training Program is self-contained and is a complete program. There are occasions within some courses where a previously-written paper or essay may apply, but you cannot test out of an entire course.
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The following is a brief timeline of the history of the "Celts", drawing on information from Brittania and other online resources.Overall TimelineBritish Isles and Cultures Referred To10,000 BCENeolithic (new stone age) Period beings in Europe.5000 BCENeolithic Period begins in British Isles; first evidence of farming appears; stone axes, antler combs, pottery in common use.4500-2500 BCEKurgan culture.4000 BCEConstruction of the "Sweet Track" (named for its discoverer, Ray Sweet) begun; many similar raised, wooden walkways were constructed at this time providing a way to traverse the low, boggy, swampy areas in the Somerset Levels, near Glastonbury; earliest-known camps or communities appear (i.e. Hembury, Devon).3500-3000 BCEFirst appearance of long barrows and chambered tombs; at Hambledon Hill (Dorset), the primitive burial rite known as "corpse exposure" was practiced, wherein bodies were left in the open air to decompose or be consumed by animals and birds.3000-2500 BCECastlerigg Stone Circle (Cumbria), one of Britain's earliest and most beautiful, begun; Pentre Ifan (Dyfed), a classic example of a chambered tomb, constructed; Bryn Celli Ddu (Anglesey), known as the "mound in the dark grove," begun, one of the finest examples of a "passage grave."2500 BCEBronze Age begins; multi-chambered tombs in use (i.e. West Kennet Long Barrow) first appearance of henge "monuments.; construction begun on Silbury Hill, Europe's largest prehistoric, man-made hill (132 ft).2500-1500 BCEMost stone circles in British Isles erected during this period; purpose of the circles is uncertain, although most experts speculate that they had either astronomical or ritual uses.2300 BCEConstruction begun on Britain's largest stone circle at Avebury.2300-1400 BCEBattle-Axe or Corded Ware culture; Beaker Folk identified by the pottery beakers (along with other objects found in their single burial sites).2000 BCEMetal objects are widely manufactured in England about this time, first from copper, then with arsenic and tin added; woven cloth appears in Britain, evidenced by findings of pins and cloth fasteners in graves; construction begun on Stonehenge's inner ring of bluestones.1800-1200 BCESecular control of society passes from priests to those who control the manufacture of metal objects.1500 BCEFarms (houses and separate, walled fields) in use on Dartmoor (Devon) and in uplands of Wales; stone circles seem to fall into disuse and decay around this time, perhaps due to a re-orientation of the society's religious attitudes and practices; burial mounds cease to be constructed; burials made near stone circles or in flat cemeteries.1500-1300 BCEÚnetice culture.1500-1200 BCETumulus culture.1300-700 BCEEmergence of a warrior class who now begins to take a central role in society. Some believe that these people, also known as the Urnfield civilization, are the "proto-Celts."1300 BCEProto-Celts arrive in Spain.1200 BCEProto - Celtic cultures in Gaul and Germania.1000 BCEEarliest hill-top earthworks ("hillforts") begin to appear, also fortified farmsteads; increasing sophistication of arts and crafts, particularly in decorative personal and animal ornamentation.750 BCEIron replaces bronze, Iron Age begins.600 BCENew Celtic invasion to Spain.600 BCEConstruction of Old Sarum begun.500 BCEEvidence of the spread of Celtic customs and artifacts across Britain; more and varied types of pottery in use, more characteristic decoration of jewelry. There was no known invasion of Britain by the Celts; they probably gradually infiltrated into British society through trade and other contact over a period of several hundred years; Druids, the intellectual class of the Celts (their own word for themselves, meaning "the hidden people"), begin a thousand year flourish.450 BCECeltic tribes come to Italy.280 BCECelts arrive to the Balkans and Asia Minor.150 BCEMetal coinage comes into use; widespread contact with continent.100 BCEFlourishing of Carn Euny (Cornwall), an Iron Age village with interlocking stone court-yard houses; community features a "fogou," an underground chamber used, possibly, for storage or defense.133 BCESpain conquered by Rome.50 BCEGaul conquered by Rome.43 CERomans conquer Britain.250 CEOgham inscriptions in Ireland and Scotland.409 CERomans leave Britain.450 CECeltic migrations to Brittany.844 CEKingdom of Scotland.In addition to the titles linked above, you may also find The Celtic World by Miranda Green and Europe: A History by Norman Davies, to be of interest.
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While the books listed on the Primary Recommended Reading List are preferred, there are occasions where Dedicant's can and have requested to review alternative books.Below are some of the books that have been approved as alternative resources by the Preceptor of ADF.Hearth CultureClassic Mythology: Images and Insights by Stephen L. Harris and Gloria PlatznerIn Search of Ancient Ireland by Carmel McCaffreyThe Wisdom of the Celts (somewhat dated, not as recommended) by Gina SigillitoModern PaganismIntroduction to Pagan Studies by Barbara Jane DavyThese books were not approved for the purpose of the Dedicant's Program.The Celts by Jean MarkaleThe Religion of the Ancient Celts by J.A. MacCullochOmens, Oghams, and Oracles by Richard Webster